Archive for Faith

Is pre-marital kissing a sin? Questions Christians ask.

Leave a comment »

PRAYER REQUEST – Gbadegesin Sijuade-Kings

Image

PRAYER REQUEST

 

Dear brother,

I’ll be making a request,

I hope it’ll be of interest

And not a bother.

I need someone

To pray for me

But not when he

Nor I’ll choose.

For those times, I fear

May not be most appropriate.

You may have enough things

And people on your prayer list already

To pray for.

I shan’t mind

If you can pray for me

Only when my name

Or my face, like lightening

Manages to cross your mind,

For then I believe

May be the most appropriate

For they do, only in expediencies.

So brother,

When next my name or face

Crosses your mind,

Take time, say a prayer

It’ll help someone

Take time, say a prayer

It’ll work for me,

PRAY.

Gbadegesin Sijuade-Kings

Follow on Twitter @iAmKingsiju

Leave a comment »

Lets wake up! Let our conscience and renewed hearts turn against corruption. corruption in our churches, in the mosques, in schools and in our communities! Let our faith stir us unto righteousness and integrity!

A New Nigeria

20120723-180424.jpg

“Labour to keep alive in your breast that little spark of celestial fire called conscience.” – George Washington

A country of over 160 million people; Nigeria is made up of two religions chiefly: Christianity and Islam. Given the high moral values, the ethics, the principles, the character conducts exemplified in both; one may perfectly conclude that Nigeria will be an ideal example of good governance, of fairness, of justice, of high moral behavior, of low crime, etc. WRONG!

Take for instance councillors, Chairman, Governors, Ministers, heads of parastatals, MDAs, PAs, SSAs, Lawmakers, etc all belong to either of both religions (where they are not atheists!) How then do we have consistent indiscipline, flagrant abuse of power and ineffective leadership as consistent attributes to these leadership positions! Intolerance, Societal dysfunction, Crime escalation (some sponsored by these heads as thugs) and unprecedented corruption are amongst the shameful display we see all around…

View original post 649 more words

Leave a comment »

Goldfish Grace by Max Lucado

Goldfish Grace by Max Lucado

 

I’ve been thinking about grace lately. The word is everywhere. My friend named his daughter Grace. A singer sang Amazing Grace in a talent show last week. I read about a politician who fell from grace. The name of my wife’s new shampoo? You got it: Grace.

 

In sermons, in songs, in slogans. Grace, everywhere! But do we get it? When our daughter Sara was four years old, she burst into the house carrying a water-filled baggie in which swam a wide-eyed burst of sunshine. “Look what they gave us at the birthday party!” (Gee, thanks.) We dumped the pet into a fishbowl and gathered around to select a name. Sebastian won. He was the star of the family. We actually set the bowl on the dinner table so we could watch him swim while we ate. The ultimate fish dinner. But then we got bored. Can’t fault Sebastian. He did everything expected of a family fish. He swam in circles and surfaced on cue to gobble fish food. He never jumped out of the bowl into the sink or demanded a seat on the couch. He spent his nights nestled amidst a green plant. Quiet. Novel. Contained. Like grace? Small enough to fit on the cabinet, contain in the aquarium. Package it up and send it home with the kids. Dump it in a bowl and watch it swim. Never causes trouble or demands attention. Everyone wants a goldfish bowl of grace, right? If you do, steer clear of Jesus Christ. He brings a wild grace. It comes at you like a fire hose: blasting, purging, cleansing. It can flush every last clod of doubt and death and infuse us with wonder and hope. Grace does not promise to stop your snoring, turn your kids into valedictorians, or guarantee the correct lottery number. Grace doesn’t make you sexy, skinny, or clever. It doesn’t change what you see in the mirror. It changes how you see what you see. Grace is everything Jesus. It uses five letters to describe six hours in which one carpenter hung on two timbers by three nails. Grace lives because he does, works because he works, and matters because he matters. To be saved by grace is to be saved by him; not by an idea, doctrine, creed, or church membership, but by Jesus himself who will sweep into heaven anyone who so much as gives him the nod. Grace is God: as Heart Surgeon, cracking open chests and extracting our crud and the desire to create it. as Grand Marshall, leading his ever-swelling parade of has-beens and never-weres out of halfway houses and prisons into His palace. as the Master who loves you enough to grab the nape of your neck and drag you out of blind alleys and deadend streets as Chief Engineer, burrowing a tunnel through stone and sediment, unwilling to leave one soul in the cavern. Grace placed a term limit on sin and danced a victory jig in a graveyard and pledges to do the same in yours, if you ask him. Goldfish grace? Not on your life. Goldfish grace happens on Sundays. God’s grace claims every tick of the clock. Goldfish grace is only as good as you are. God’s grace is as good as he is. Goldfish grace winks at sin. God’s grace nukes it. Goldfish grace is a lucky charm crucifix on a necklace. God’s grace is a tiger in your heart. Here’s a prayer that you and I discover God’s greatest news: “For the grace of God that brings salvation has appeared…” (Titus 2:11). May it appear to you!

 

5/15/2012 copyrighted material

Leave a comment »

AWAY FROM THE BRINK – Pastor Kumuyi

IT has become imperative for all Nigerians to join hands in quickly moving the nation away from the precarious knife-edge on which she is now seemingly placed and rein-in dispositions that are dysfunctional to our well-being. The endless debates and energy-sapping controversies over restructuring, resource control, revenue allocation formula, ethnic nationalities and so on must not be allowed to imperil the posterity of this great nation. Any inadvertent or deliberate recourse to dismember the nation is an option that must be shelved. True, the prevailing situation of inertia, dashed expectations and misapplication of resources are as daunting as they are frustrating. Yet, the solution cannot lie in despair or in a resort to a bellicose option.

Every society seeks to resolve crises and conflicts usually through dialogue. And wherever this fails, or where contesting parties refuse this option, the portents have always been very dire. It led to wars and bloodshed, which have merely served to expose the savagery of the depraved human nature. I have always been intrigued by the action of combatants who eventually revert to the negotiating table, after a needless and clearly avoidable bloodletting.

The rather over–heated debates in our country will challenge anyone’s sensitivity. Except that we have seen this cycle time and again, you might conclude that the nation will evaporate the next day. The re-assuring thing is that the aggressive and seemingly separatist posturing in the media, fly in the face of the relatively peaceful atmosphere, which substantially governs our co-existence across the land. Incontrovertibly, the need to re-structure not just our politics, but indeed our psyche, has been long overdue. I am glad to note that a consensus seems to have emerged from across the nation of the need to re-configure our federal arrangement. As I keenly follow the debate, what has not been resolved, or what might prove knotty to resolve, is the modus operandi for the re-structuring process without jeopardising our peaceful co-existence and without offending the sensibilities of any segment of the federation. I therefore urge for maximum restraint and caution as we all contribute to the discussion on re-structuring or re-jigging the political make-up of the country.

By my background and worldview, I do not always accept negative conclusions about the country. Yes, the country is in a worse state than it should have been, especially viewed alongside other nations with whom we shared same indices of development decades ago but, who ironically, have soared away to measured greatness. Yet, we must never write-off the fortunes of Nigeria. We must accept that it will take a few more years to remedy the dislocations that prolonged military rule caused in every facet of our national life. The obviously skewed political arrangement about which we are all complaining, is a product of elongated military rule. We can say the same in every other aspect of our national life. But our country still enjoys a degree of leverage in the comity of nations. Our human resource is a massive strength if properly utilised. Together with the abundant natural resources, they place us on a higher pedestal, all other things being equal. Even if this is not popular with many, the level of integration in our country across ethnic, regional and religious frontiers is by far higher than many are willing to admit.

We must avoid allowing contemporary irritants in the landscape such as terrorism, intense religious disputes or over-arching political dislocations to imperil our co-existence. Let’s for a moment stretch our imagination to consider a scenario in which we all say as it were, “to thy tents O Israel”. Will that bring to an end the push-pull tendencies of all forces in each ethnic nationality? Will the dialectical differences in each ethnic group not come to an upsurge again? Pray, will the clamour for change and self-determination inherent in the human make-up not come to the fore if even in a minute form? These no doubt, are hypothetical issues to which no one can proffer ready answers. But we must avoid the path of least resistance. We must walk away from the brink of national collapse, unending tension and perennial feuds. There is nothing we have passed through, or nothing we have experienced that cannot be resolved through constructive dialogue.

President Goodluck Jonathan was right when he observed recently that the prevailing instability is worse than the conditions that led to the civil war. Now, that’s the cliff edge overlooking a bottomless abyss! Staying longer at that tip is perilous, and as deadly as plunging into the pit! We must hastily walk away from the brink, considering that our generation has a great chance of erecting the atmosphere for a better and more united, peaceful and just Nigeria. The foremost prerequisite for this is equity and fairness, while striking a better and more enduring balance between the states (and ethnic groups).

To do so, we need the Federal Government to initiate a summit of well-meaning and committed citizens to discuss our future.  I believe strongly that only dispassionate and detached stakeholders must come together to resolve the growing crisis of confidence in our country. Such stakeholders are still available in this country. The time has finally come to address the loose ends of our political environment and produce an enduring solution on how we all can peacefully coexist, our diverse backgrounds notwithstanding.

Our challenges, as they were in the past, have arisen from the reality and demands of our natural diversities. We see them as negative and divisive factors. So we fear them. However, as a pastor with the background of a mathematician, I know there is enormous strength in numbers and their variables! China and India are using their vast human resources to redraw the economic map of the world. Even Brazil from South American has recently displaced Britain in the league of global industrial powers. So, why would Nigeria seek to draw down this potential? Let us hold a national conference or a summit or whatever concept we adopt, to celebrate our coat of many colours, to discuss our strength of diversities and numbers. We are not meeting to weaken our vitality. We should meet to outlaw poverty and corruption, to establish constitutional justice, to give the citizens a feeling of participation in formulation, articulation and execution of their hopes of deprivation and alienation from Nigeria’s common wealth. We should meet to cut off the tendencies that drive our people to acts of self-help, manifesting in murderous violence.   Dialogue will take care of this state of despondency, so that we can, as a famous Chinese writer once said, that to overcome others’ armies without fighting is the best of skills.

What about the modality for choosing those to participate at the conference without attracting the disquiet of the National Assembly or other entrenched interests? Let’s look back and consider what was done at grave periods of Nigeria’s history. Leaders of thought were carefully chosen then to discuss the sensitive challenges of those times. Although a civil war still ensued, yet we cannot forget the contributions of those leaders in stemming the tide of what could have led to the total obliteration of the country.

I urge the Federal Government, therefore, to carefully compile the names of truly distinguished and dispassionate Nigerians who still believe in the Nigerian dream. The main theme should be the re-structuring of our socio-political and economic landscape without subverting our co-existence.

• Pastor Kumuyi is General Superintendent of Deeper Christian Life Ministry.

Leave a comment »

When I say… “I am a Christian” … Maya Angelou

When I say… “I am a Christian”

 

When I say… “I am a Christian”I’m not shouting “I’m clean living.”I’m whispering “I was lost,Now I’m found and forgiven.”

When I say… “I am a Christian”I don’t speak of this with pride.I’m confessing that I stumbleand need Christ to be my guide.

When I say… “I am a Christian”I’m not trying to be strong.I’m professing that I’m weakAnd need His strength to carry on.

When I say… “I am a Christian”I’m not bragging of success.I’m admitting I have failedAnd need God to clean my mess.

When I say… “I am a Christian”I’m not claiming to be perfect,My flaws are far too visibleBut, God believes I am worth it.

When I say… “I am a Christian”I still feel the sting of pain.I have my share of heartachesSo I call upon His name.

When I say… “I am a Christian”I’m not holier than thou,I’m just a simple sinnerWho received God’s good grace, somehow!

 

Maya Angelou

Comments (1) »